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THE 3 STAGES OF THE TDCT PROGRAM AND
HOW TO GRADUATE

The Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) program has been meticulously designed to facilitate healing and personal growth. Although some of the information may appear repetitive, it is crucial to comprehend the entirety of the program to achieve optimal results. TDCT comprises three stages that must be completed to successfully graduate from the program and attain the ability to manage non-sexual physical contact.

 

Additionally, Connection and Companion Therapy (C&CT) will be briefly discussed as a follow-up therapy for those who desire or require it. C&CT is intended to help individuals maintain the progress achieved during TDCT and foster healthy relationships with others. It is an excellent way to continue healing and establish healthy boundaries in all relationships. While participation in C&CT is not mandatory, it is highly recommended. It is important to remember that healing is a journey, not a destination, and our team is committed to supporting individuals every step of the way.

FROM HANDSHAKES TO PANCAKES: A GUIDE TO TOUCH DIRECT CONTACT THERAPY (TDCT) AND STAGES OF TDCT

EXPLORING THE BENEFITS OF TOUCH DIRECT CONTACT THERAPY

 

Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) is a form of therapy that involves non-sexual touch between individuals. It is designed to provide comfort, connection, and safety through physical touch. The treatment is typically conducted in a group setting, with trained Practitioners guiding participants through a series of touch exercises. Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) is based on the idea that touch is a fundamental human need, and that lack of touch can lead to feelings of isolation, anxiety, and depression. Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) aims to improve mental health and overall well-being by providing individuals with safe and consensual touch.

JOURNEYING THROUGH THE THREE STAGES OF TOUCH DIRECT CONTACT THERAPY

 

This section aims to provide an overview of the three stages of Touch Direct Contact Therapy. The section on this website will explain each stage in detail, including the purpose of each stage, the types of touch involved, and the benefits of each stage. By providing an overview of the three stages, this section aims to help individuals understand what to expect from Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) and how it can benefit their mental health and overall well-being. Additionally, I will discuss the requirements for graduating from the program and the option to continue practicing consent and touching through Connection and Companion Therapy (C&CT), similar yet different to Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT). Overall, this section seeks to provide a comprehensive guide to Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) and its potential benefits.

STAGE 1: BASIC TOUCH

FROM THE GROUND UP: UNDERSTANDING THE PURPOSE OF STAGE 1 IN TOUCH DIRECT CONTACT THERAPY

 

Stage 1 of Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) is designed to introduce individuals to basic touch. The purpose of Stage 1 is to help individuals become more comfortable with touch and to provide them with a foundation for the more advanced stages of treatment. Stage 1 includes 150 types of touches that focus on primary forms of touch, such as a handshake, pat on the back, or putting your hand on your hip. These touches are non-sexual and are designed to provide individuals with a sense of connection and comfort. By completing Stage 1, individuals can become more aware of their touch preferences and better understand their comfort with touch. Overall, the purpose of Stage 1 is to help individuals become more comfortable with touch and to lay the foundation for the more advanced stages of Touch Direct Contact Therapy.

 

As a client, you need to be able to hold each position or pose for 5 minutes before moving on to stage two.

 

THE POWER OF TOUCH: A CATALOGUE OF THE 150 TOUCHES IN STAGE 1 OF TOUCH DIRECT CONTACT THERAPY

 

1. Handshake
2. High five
3. Fist bump
4. Shoulder pat
5. Arm around shoulder
6. Back pat
7. Hug
8. Side hug
9. Hand on the back
10. Hand on the arm

11. Hand on leg
12. Hand on knee
13. Hand on foot
14. Hand on head
15. Hand on face
16. Hand on chest
17. Hand on stomach
18. Hand on hip
19. Hand on the waist
20. Hand on the shoulder blade

21. Hand on neck
22. Hand on the ear
23. Hand on the nose
24. Hand on mouth
25. Hand on forehead
26. Hand on chin
27. Hand on the cheeks
28. Hand on eye
29. Hand on the temples
30. Hand on the back of the head

31. Hand-on hair
32. Hand on the wrist
33. Hand on the ankle
34. Hand on the toes
35. Hand on the elbow
36. Hand on the thigh
37. Hand on calf
38. Hand on the heel
39. Hand on the arch of the foot
40. Hand on the sole of the foot

41. Hand on the back of the hand
42. Hand on the palm of the hand
43. Hand on fingers
44. Hand on thumb
45. Hand on knuckles
46. Hand-on nails
47. Hand on cuticles
48. Hand-on veins
49. Hand-on bones
50. Hand-on muscles

51. Sitting side by side
52. Standing side by side
53. Standing back to back
54. Sitting back to back
55. Sitting facing each other
56. Standing facing each other
57. Walking side by side
58. Walking arm in arm
59. Walking hand in hand
60. Sitting with legs crossed

61. Sitting with legs stretched out
62. Sitting with legs bent
63. Sitting with one leg crossed over the other
64. Sitting with one leg stretched out and one leg bent
65. Standing with one foot forward
66. Standing with one foot back
67. Standing with feet shoulder-width apart
68. Standing with feet together
69. Standing with one hand on hip
70. Standing with both hands on hips

71. Standing with arms crossed
72. Standing with hands clasped in front
73. Standing with hands clasped behind
74. Standing with hands in pockets
75. Sitting with hands in lap
76. Sitting with hands on knees
77. Sitting with hands on thighs
78. Sitting with hands clasped in front
79. Sitting with hands clasped behind
80. Lying down with arms at sides

81. Lying down with arms stretched out
82. Lying down with hands on chest
83. Lying down with hands on stomach
84. Lying down with hands behind head
85. Lying down with hands behind back
86. Lying down with hands on hips
87. Lying down with hands on thighs
88. Lying down with hands clasped in front
89. Lying down with hands clasped behind
90. Lying down with hands on knees

91. Lying down with hands on shins
92. Lying down with hands on ankles
93. Lying down with hands-on feet
94. Lying down with hands-on toes
95. Lying down with hands on face
96. Lying down with hands-on eyes
97. Lying down with hands on ears
98. Lying down with the hands-on nose
99. Lying down with hands on mouth
100. Lying down with hands on forehead

101. Lying down with hands on chin
102. Lying down with hands on cheeks
103. Lying down with hands-on temples
104. Lying down with hands on the back of the head
105. Lying down with hands-on hair
106. Lying down with hands-on wrists
107. Lying down with hands on ankles
108. Lying down with hands-on toes
109. Lying down with hands on shins
110. Lying down with hands on knees

111. Lying down with hands on thighs
112. Lying down with hands on hips
113. Lying down with my hands on my stomach
114. Lying down with hands on chest
115. Lying down with the hands-on back
116. Lying down with hands on shoulders
117. Lying down with a hands-on neck
118. Lying down with hands on ears
119. Lying down with hands-on eyes
120. Lying down with the hands-on nose

121. Lying down with hands on mouth
122. Lying down with hands on forehead
123. Lying down with hands on chin
124. Lying down with hands on cheeks
125. Lying down with hands-on temples
126. Lying down with hands on the back of the head
127. Lying down with hands-on hair
128. Lying down with hands-on wrists
129. Lying down with hands on ankles
130. Lying down with hands-on toes

131. Lying down with hands on shins
132. Lying down with hands on knees
133. Lying down with hands on thighs
134. Lying down with hands on hips
135. Lying down with my hands on my stomach
136. Lying down with hands on chest
137. Lying down with hands-on back
138. Lying down with hands on shoulders
139. Lying down with hands-on neck
140. Lying down with hands on ears

141. Lying down with hands-on eyes
142. Lying down with hands-on nose
143. Lying down with hands on mouth
144. Lying down with hands on forehead
145. Lying down with hands on chin
146. Lying down with hands on cheeks
147. Lying down with hands-on temples
148. Lying down with hands on the back of the head
149. Lying down with hands-on hair
150. Lying down with hands-on wrists

 

TOUCHING ON THE BASICS: HOW SIMPLE TOUCHES CAN MAKE A BIG DIFFERENCE IN COMBATING ISOLATION

 

Basic touch is an important aspect of human connection and can help individuals feel more connected and less isolated. Touch is a fundamental human need, and lack of touch can lead to feelings of loneliness, anxiety, and depression. Basic touches, such as a handshake or pat on the back, can give individuals a sense of connection and comfort. It can also help individuals feel more accepted and valued by others.

 

In addition to its emotional benefits, basic touch can also have physical benefits. Indication has been shown to reduce stress and anxiety, lower blood pressure, and improve immune function. Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) aims to improve mental and physical health and overall well-being by providing individuals with essential touch.

 

The importance of essential touch lies in its ability to provide individuals with a sense of connection and comfort. Individuals can better understand comfort with touch by incorporating critical touch into Touch Direct Contact Therapy. They can experience the emotional and physical benefits that come with it.

STAGE 2: INTERTWINING BODIES

EXPANDING THE TOUCH EXPERIENCE: THE PURPOSE AND BENEFITS OF STAGE 2 IN TOUCH DIRECT CONTACT THERAPY

 

Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) is a type of therapy that involves physical touch to promote emotional and psychological healing. Stage 2 of Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) provides individuals with more touch through non-sexual positions. This stage aims to help individuals become more comfortable with physical touch and develop a sense of trust and safety with their Practitioner. Non-sexual positions may include closeness where your body is intertwined with someone else’s. These are intended to provide comfort and support without any sexual implications. This stage is often used to help individuals who have experienced trauma or have difficulty with physical touch due to past experiences.

 

FROM BASICS TO ADVANCED: WHY STAGE 1 IS A PREREQUISITE FOR STAGE 2 IN TOUCH DIRECT CONTACT THERAPY

 

Completing Stage 1 of Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) is a requirement before moving on to Stage 2 because it lays the foundation for the therapeutic relationship between the client and Practitioner. Stage 1 involves building trust and establishing boundaries, which is essential for creating a safe and supportive environment for physical touch. During Stage 1, the Practitioner and client work together to establish clear communication, set boundaries, and develop a sense of trust and safety. This stage also involves exploring any past experiences or trauma that may impact the client's ability to engage in physical touch. By completing Stage 1, the client is better prepared to engage in Stage 2, which involves more physical contact and intimacy. Without completing Stage 1, the client may not feel comfortable or safe engaging in physical contact, which could hinder the effectiveness of treatment.

 

As a client, you need to be able to hold each position or pose for 15 minutes before moving on to stage three.

 

EXPLORING THE DIVERSITY OF POSITIONS: A GUIDE TO THE 50 POSITIONS IN STAGE 2 OF TOUCH DIRECT CONTACT THERAPY

1. Sitting side by side with arms around each other
2. Lying down with heads on each other's shoulders
3. Sitting with legs intertwined
4. Lying down with legs intertwined
5. Sitting with heads resting on each other's chests

6. Lying down with heads resting on each other's chests
7. Sitting with one person's head on the other's lap
8. Lying down with one person's head on the other's lap
9. Sitting with one person's back against the other's chest
10. Lying down with one person's back against the other's chest

11. Sitting with one person's head on the other's shoulder
12. Lying down with one person's head on the other's shoulder
13. Sitting with arms around each other's waists
14. Lying down with arms around each other's waists
15. Sitting with one person's arms around the other's neck
16. Lying down with one person's arms around the other's neck
17. Sitting with one person's arms around the other's waist and the other's head on their shoulder
18. Lying down with one person's arms around the other's waist and the other's head on their shoulder
19. Sitting with one person's head on the other's lap and the other's arms around their shoulders

20. Lying down with one person's head on the other's lap and the other's arms around their shoulders
21. Sitting with one person's head on the other's chest and the other's arms around their back
22. Lying down with one person's head on the other's chest and the other's arms around their back
23. Sitting with one person's head on the other's lap and the other's arms around their waist
24. Lying down with one person's head on the other's lap and the other's arms around their waist
25. Sitting with one person's head on the other's shoulder and the other's arms around their waist
26. Lying down with one person's head on the other's shoulder and the other's arms around their waist
27. Sitting with one person's head on the other's lap and the other's legs wrapped around their waist
28. Lying down with one person's head on the other's lap and the other's legs wrapped around their waist
29. Sitting with one person's head on the other's chest and the other's legs wrapped around their waist

30. Lying down with one person's head on the other's chest and the other's legs wrapped around their waist
31. Sitting with one person's head on the other's lap and the other's arms and legs wrapped around their waist
32. Lying down with one person's head on the other's lap and the other's arms and legs wrapped around their waist
33. Sitting with one person's head on the other's chest and the other's arms and legs wrapped around their waist
34. Lying down with one person's head on the other's chest and the other's arms and legs wrapped around their waist
35. Sitting with one person's head on the other's lap and the other's arms and legs wrapped around their body
36. Lying down with one person's head on the other's lap and the other's arms and legs wrapped around their body
37. Sitting with one person's head on the other's chest and the other's arms and legs wrapped around their body
38. Lying down with one person's head on the other's chest and the other's arms and legs wrapped around their body
39. Sitting with one person's head on the other's lap and the other's head on their chest
40. Lying down with one person's head on the other's lap and the other's head on their chest

41. Sitting with one person's head on the other's chest and the other's head on their lap
42. Lying down with one person's head on the other's chest and the other's head on their lap
43. Sitting with one person's head on the other's shoulder and the other's head on their chest
44. Lying down with one person's head on the other's shoulder and the other's head on their chest
45. Sitting with one person's head on the other's lap and the other's head on their shoulder
46. Lying down with one person's head on the other's lap and the other's head on their shoulder
47. Sitting with one person's head on the other's chest and the other's head on their shoulder
48. Lying down with one person's head on the other's chest and the other's head on their shoulder
49. Sitting with one person's head on the other's lap and the other's head on their back
50. Lying down with one person's head on the other's lap and the other's head on their back.

THE POWER OF TOUCH WITHOUT SEXUAL OVERTONES: UNDERSTANDING THE NON-SEXUAL POSITIONS IN TOUCH DIRECT CONTACT THERAPY

 

The non-sexual nature of the positions used in Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) is a fundamental aspect of treatment. The positions are designed to provide comfort and connection between the client and Practitioner without sexual suggestions. The positions used in Stage 2 of treatment are carefully selected to ensure they are appropriate and non-threatening. They may include holding hands, hugging, or sitting close together and are intended to provide comfort and support.

 

The non-sexual nature of the positions is essential because it helps to establish clear boundaries and prevent any confusion or misunderstandings between the client and Practitioner. It also helps create a safe and supportive environment for clients to explore their emotions and feelings. By focusing on non-sexual touch, treatment can help clients who have experienced trauma or have difficulty with physical touch due to past experiences.

 

Overall, the non-sexual nature of the positions used in Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) is essential for creating a safe and supportive environment for clients to explore their emotions and feelings. It helps establish clear boundaries and prevent confusion or misunderstandings while providing comfort and connection between the client and Practitioner.

STAGE 3: THE POWER OF TOUCH AND EXAMINING
NON-SEXUAL INTIMACY
IN STAGE 3 BODY-ON-BODY CONTACT

THE BENEFITS OF STAGE 3: UNDERSTANDING FULL BODY CONTACT

 

Stage 3 of Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) is the final stage of treatment and involves providing individuals with even more touch through full body positions. This stage aims to help individuals develop a more profound connection and intimacy with their Practitioner. Full-body positions may include lying down together, spooning, or other positions that involve complete-body contact without sexual overtones.

 

The goal of Stage 3 is to help individuals who have experienced trauma or have difficulty with physical touch to develop a sense of safety and trust with their Practitioner. By engaging in full-body positions, clients can experience a deeper level of physical and emotional connection, which can help to promote healing and growth.

 

It is important to note that Stage 3 is only appropriate for individuals who have completed Stage 1 and Stage 2 of treatment and feel comfortable and safe engaging in full-body positions. The Practitioner will work closely with the client to ensure they are ready for this stage and feel comfortable and safe.

 

Stage 3 of Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) is designed to provide individuals with even more touch and nonsexual intimacy in a safe and supportive environment. It is intended to help individuals develop a more profound sense of connection and trust with their Practitioner, which can promote healing and growth.

 

THE IMPORTANCE OF COMPLETING STAGES 1 AND 2

BEFORE ADVANCING TO STAGE 3

 

Completing Stages 1 and 2 of Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) is a requirement before moving on to Stage 3 because it is essential to establish a foundation of trust, safety, and comfort between the client and Practitioner. Stages 1 and 2 involve building a therapeutic relationship, setting boundaries, and developing a sense of trust and safety with physical touch. These stages are designed to help clients become more comfortable with physical contact and to create an understanding of confidence and safety with their Practitioner.

 

Moving on to Stage 3 without completing Stages 1 and 2 could harm the client and hinder the effectiveness of treatment. Without establishing a foundation of trust and safety, engaging in full-body positions could be overwhelming or triggering for the client. Ensuring the client is ready and comfortable before moving on to Stage 3 is essential.

 

Completing Stages 1 and 2 of Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) is a requirement before moving on to Stage 3 because it is essential to establish a foundation of trust, safety, and comfort between the client and Practitioner. This foundation is necessary to ensure that treatment is effective, and that the client feels safe and supported.

 

As a client, you need to be able to hold each position or pose in stage 3 for 30 minutes before graduating.

THE ROLE OF EACH POSITION IN STAGE 3: A DETAILED ANALYSIS

 

1. Baby Bear: In this position, one person lies on their back while the other lies on their side, with their head resting on their partner's chest. This position benefits Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) as it promotes safety and security, similar to how a baby bear feels when cuddled by its mother.

 

2. Hug Boat: In this position, two people sit facing each other with their legs intertwined and arms wrapped around each other. This position benefits Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) as it promotes a sense of intimacy and closeness, similar to how two people would hug in a boat.

 

3. Lap of Luxury: In this position, one person sits with their legs crossed while the other sits in their lap, with their arms wrapped around each other. This position benefits Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) as it promotes a sense of comfort and relaxation, similar to how one would feel sitting on a luxurious lap.

 

4. Mouse and Cheese: In this position, one person lies on their back while the other lies on their side, with their head resting on their partner's shoulder. This position benefits Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) as it promotes a sense of playfulness and fun, similar to how a mouse would play with a piece of cheese.

 

5. Koala: In this position, one person sits with their legs crossed while the other sits on their lap, with their arms wrapped around each other. This position benefits Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) as it promotes safety and security, similar to how a koala feels when clinging to a tree.

 

6. Tetris: In this position, two people lie on their sides facing each other, their legs intertwined, and their arms wrapped around each other. This position benefits Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) as it promotes a sense of connection and harmony, similar to how Tetris pieces fit together.

 

7. Two Peas in A Pod: In this position, two people lie on their sides facing each other, their bodies touching, and their arms wrapped around each other. This position benefits Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) as it promotes a sense of closeness and intimacy, similar to how two peas would fit snugly in a pod.

 

8. Gummy Bear: In this position, two people lie on their sides facing each other, their legs intertwined, and their arms wrapped around each other. This position benefits Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) as it promotes a sense of playfulness and fun, similar to how two gummy bears would stick together.

 

9. Pancake and Syrup: In this position, one person lies on their back while the other lies on top of them, with their arms wrapped around each other. This position is beneficial for Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) as it promotes a sense of comfort and relaxation, similar to how pancakes and syrup are a comforting and indulgent treat.

**Pancake and Syrup is the final position in stage three. Once this position is mastered for 30 minutes with the client and practitioner taking turns being Pancake and Syrup, you may graduate from this program.

 

These positions can benefit therapeutic touch via Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) as they promote relaxation, reduce stress and anxiety, and provide comfort and support. They can also create a sense of closeness and non-sexual intimacy, which can be helpful for individuals experiencing feelings of loneliness or isolation. However, it is essential to note that these positions should only be used with the consent of both individuals and in a safe and appropriate setting.

 

Exploring The Intimate and Safe Nature of Non-Sexual Positions

 

The non-sexual and non-arousing nature of the positions used in Stage 3 of Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) is a fundamental aspect of treatment. The positions are designed to provide individuals with safety and intimacy without sexual or erotic connotations. The positions used in Stage 3 may include lying down together or other positions that involve therapeutic total-body contact.

 

The non-sexual and non-arousing nature of the positions is essential because it helps to establish clear boundaries and prevent any confusion or misunderstandings between the client and Practitioner. It also helps create a safe and supportive environment for clients to explore their emotions and feelings. By focusing on non-sexual touch, treatment can help clients who have experienced trauma or have difficulty with physical contact due to past experiences.

 

The positions used in Stage 3 are carefully selected to ensure they are appropriate and non-threatening. The Practitioner will work closely with the client to ensure they feel comfortable and safe throughout the process. The goal of Stage 3 is to help individuals develop a more profound sense of connection and intimacy with their Practitioner, which can promote healing and growth.

 

Overall, the non-sexual and non-arousing nature of the positions used in Stage 3 of Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) is essential for creating a safe and supportive environment for clients to explore their emotions and feelings. It helps establish clear boundaries and prevent confusion or misunderstandings while providing safety and intimacy between the client and Practitioner.

GRADUATION AND BEYOND

MEETING THE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATING FROM THE PROGRAM: A THREE-STAGE JOURNEY

 

Graduating from the Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) program requires completing all three stages of treatment and being able to handle the positions in Stage 3 for a minimum of 30 minutes each. This requirement is in place to ensure that the client is fully engaged in treatment and has developed a sense of comfort and safety with physical touch.

 

To graduate from the program, the client must have completed Stage 1, which involves building trust and establishing boundaries, and Stage 2, which provides individuals with more touch through non-sexual positions. The client must also have completed Stage 3, which involves giving individuals even more touch through full-body positions.

 

In addition to completing all three stages, the client must be able to handle the positions in Stage 3 for a minimum of 30 minutes each. This requirement is in place to ensure that the client has developed a sense of comfort and safety with physical touch and can engage in full-body positions without feeling overwhelmed or triggered.

 

Once the client has met these requirements, they will successfully graduate from the Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) program. Graduating from the program indicates that the client has made significant progress in their healing journey and has developed a more profound sense of connection and intimacy with their Practitioner.

 

THE BENEFITS OF CONTINUING CONSENT AND TOUCH THROUGH TOUCH DIRECT CONTACT THERAPY: ADDING A CONNECTION AND COMPANION THERAPY (C&CT) APPROACH

 

This therapy can benefit individuals who have experienced trauma, anxiety, depression, or other mental health issues. Treatment can help individuals feel more connected, reduce stress, and improve their well-being.

 

One option for individuals who have completed a Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) program is to continue practicing consent and touching through ongoing Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) sessions via C&CT Therapy sessions. These sessions can provide endless benefits even after graduating from the program. Here are some reasons why:

 

1. Continued Consent Practice: Consent is crucial to Touch Direct Contact Therapy. Practicing consent in a safe and controlled environment can help individuals feel more comfortable setting boundaries and communicating their needs in other areas.

 

2. Improved Mental Health: Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) has been shown to improve mental health by reducing stress and anxiety. Practicing this therapy can help individuals maintain these benefits and improve their well-being.

 

3. Increased Sense of Community: Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) can help individuals feel more connected to others. Practicing this therapy can help individuals build a sense of community and support system.

 

4. Improved Communication Skills: Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) involves clear communication and active listening. Practicing this therapy can help individuals improve their communication skills in other areas.

 

Some of the benefits of continuing consent and touch through TDCT with a Connection and Companion Therapy (C&CT) approaches include:

 

1. Increased Feelings of Safety and Comfort: Connection and Companion Therapy (C&CT) can help clients feel safe and comfortable with physical touch, which can be especially important for those who have experienced trauma or have difficulty trusting others.

 

2. Improved Communication and Boundaries: By incorporating consent and clear boundaries into TDCT, clients can learn how to communicate their needs and preferences in a safe and supportive environment.

 

3. Reduced Stress and Anxiety: Physical touch has been shown to reduce stress and anxiety, and incorporating Connection and Companion Therapy (C&CT) into TDCT can further enhance these benefits.

 

4. Increased Feelings of Connection and Trust: TDCT with a Connection and Companion Therapy (C&CT) approach can help clients feel more connected to their Practitioner and build confidence in the therapeutic relationship.

 

Overall, continuing consent and touch through TDCT with a Connection and Companion Therapy (C&CT) approach can be a powerful tool for promoting healing and well-being. By creating a safe and supportive environment for physical touch, Practitioners can help clients overcome their fears and establish healthy boundaries and communication skills. Continuing to practice through a C&CT session can provide ongoing benefits for individuals who have completed a Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) program. It can help individuals maintain the benefits of treatment and improve their overall well-being.

Resources and Additional Readings

American Massage Therapy Association - www.amtamassage.org

 

Anand, K. J., & Hickey, P. R. (1987). Pain and its effects in the human neonate and fetus. New England Journal of Medicine, 317(21), 1321-1329.

 

Association for Bodywork and Massage Professionals - www.abmp.com

 

Beider, S., & Moyer, C. A. (2018). Randomized controlled trials of pediatric massage: A review. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2018.

 

Chaitow, L. (2011). Soft tissue manipulation: A practitioner's guide to the diagnosis and treatment of soft tissue dysfunction and reflex activity. Elsevier Health Sciences.

 

Cuddle Comfort - www.cuddlecomfort.com

 

Cuddle Party - www.cuddleparty.com

 

Cuddle Sanctuary - www.cuddlesanctuary.com

 

Cuddle Up to Me - www.cuddleuptome.com

 

Ditzen, B., Schaer, M., Gabriel, B., Bodenmann, G., Ehlert, U., & Heinrichs, M. (2009). Intranasal oxytocin increases positive communication and reduces cortisol levels during couple conflict. Biological Psychiatry, 65(9), 728-731.

 

Field, T. (2010). Touch for socioemotional and physical well-being: A review. Developmental Review, 30(4), 367-383.

 

Field, T., Diego, M., & Hernandez-Reif, M. (2010). Massage therapy research review. Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, 16(3), 157-162.

 

Field, T., Diego, M., & Hernandez-Reif, M. (2010). Preterm infant massage therapy research: A review. Infant Behavior and Development, 33(2), 115-124.

 

Field, T., Diego, M., & Hernandez-Reif, M. (2010). Tai chi/yoga effects on anxiety, heartrate, EEG and math computations. Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, 16(4), 235-238.

Field, T., Diego, M., & Hernandez-Reif, M. (2010). Tai chi/yoga reduces prenatal depression, anxiety and sleep disturbances.

Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, 16(4), 239-243.

 

Field, T., Diego, M., & Hernandez-Reif, M. (2010). Yoga and massage therapy reduce prenatal depression and prematurity. Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, 14(3), 297-306.

 

Field, T., Diego, M., & Hernandez-Reif, M. (2010). Yoga and massage therapy reduce prenatal depression and prematurity. Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, 14(3), 297-306.

 

Field, T., Diego, M., & Hernandez-Reif, M. (2010). Yoga and massage therapy reduce prenatal depression and prematurity. Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, 14(3), 297-306.

 

Field, T., Diego, M., & Hernandez-Reif, M. (2010). Yoga and massage therapy

 

Field, T., Hernandez-Reif, M., Diego, M., Schanberg, S., & Kuhn, C. (2005). Cortisol decreases and serotonin and dopamine increase following massage therapy. International Journal of Neuroscience, 115(10), 1397-1413.

 

Grewen, K. M., Girdler, S. S., Amico, J., & Light, K. C. (2005). Effects of partner support on resting oxytocin, cortisol, norepinephrine, and blood pressure before and after warm partner contact. Psychosomatic Medicine, 67(4), 531-538.

 

Hernandez-Reif, M., Field, T., & Thimas, E. (2001). Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: Benefits from Tai Chi. Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, 5(2), 120-123.

 

Hernandez-Reif, M., Field, T., Krasnegor, J., & Theakston, H. (2001). High blood pressure and associated symptoms were reduced by massage therapy. Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, 5(1), 31-38.

 

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Positive Peer Mentoring - www.positivepeermentoring.com

 

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If you are feeling any of the above, please think about booking a session.

NOT in PA? No worries, she offers phone and video visits as well.


Use the button to see her updated calendar and book her today

When you have a Therapeutic Mentoring Session with Corinne Pulliam, a Positive Peer Mentoring she will:

  • Recognize her reactions to what the client is telling her.

  • Be non-judgmental and empathic.

  • Show a genuine interest in what the client is telling her.

  • Try to use the language of the client she is interacting with.

  • Validate what the client is telling her and show the client she is actively listening.

  • Find out what else is happening in the client's life (stress, relationship difficulties, etc.)

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