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Touch Direct Contact Therapy Sessions

These sessions are strictly that consensual touch and physical contact. I took online TDCT training courses at edX. 

 

All NEW clients must be screened; this is another word for a FREEconsultation before your first session. To become screened, please click the button below. 

TOUCH DIRECT CONTACT THERAPY:
WHAT IT IS AND WHAT IT IS NOT

Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT), also known as "Touch Therapy," is commonly mistaken for "Cuddle Therapy"; however, it is not. It should be noted that there can be cuddle-like positions in this type of treatment; however, that is not our ultimate goal or focus. TDCT is a form of therapy that involves physical touch between the TDCT Practitioner and the client. This type of therapy is often used to help individuals who have experienced trauma, anxiety, depression, or other mental health issues. However, it is essential to understand what Touch Direct Contact Therapy is and what it is not.

TDCT is a type of controlled exposure therapy involving consented nonsexual touch. It helps individuals overcome diagnoses caused by emotional and physiological hardships by offering them physical interaction with a trusted professional. With TDCT, an individual can regain control of their life. Touch is ALWAYS done with consent and within accepted personal boundaries, and may be stopped at any time for any reason by the client or practitioner.

OTHER DEFINITIONS AND FURTHER EXPLANATION:

Touch Direct Contact Therapy is considered a form of alternative medicine that uses touch to promote healing and relaxation. It is based on the belief that communication can help release tension and encourage energy flow in the body. Touch Direct Contact Therapy can enable individuals with various physical and mental health conditions.

Touch Direct Contact Therapy is often considered an integrated approach involving touch to promote healing and relaxation. It is based on the belief that communication can help release tension and encourage energy flow in the body. Touch Direct Contact Therapy can help individuals with physical and mental health conditions such as chronic pain, anxiety, depression, and PTSD.

IS TDCT SEXUAL, AROUSING, OR ROMANTIC?

Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT) is a form of treatment involving touch to help touch-deprived individuals. This treatment is nonsexual, non-arousing, and non-romantic.

TDCT is nonsexual, non-arousing, and non-romantic because it is a therapy designed to help touch-deprived individuals. The touch used in TDCT is not intended to be sexual in any way. The TDCT Practitioner who administers TDCT is trained to use contact in a therapeutic and nonsexual way. The touch used in TDCT is intended to provide comfort and support to the individual receiving the therapy.

Specifically, TDCT is based on the idea that touch is a fundamental human need and that touch deprivation (especially with those who have experienced trauma) can negatively affect an individual's physical, emotional, and mental health. Touch deprivation can lead to feelings of loneliness, anxiety, depression, and even physical illness. TDCT aims to address these adverse effects by providing individuals with safe and appropriate touch.

The touch used in TDCT is typically gentle and non-invasive. The TDCT Practitioner who administers TDCT is trained to be sensitive to the individual's needs and preferences. The therapy is usually conducted in a private and comfortable setting, and the individual receiving the treatment is always in control of the session.

TDCT is effective in various settings, including hospitals, nursing homes, and emotional and mental health clinics. It has been used to help individuals with anxiety, depression, and many more. TDCT has the most significant positive effect and has also been used to help individuals who have experienced trauma or abuse.

In conclusion, TDCT is a nonsexual, non-arousing, and non-romantic form of therapy that uses touch to help individuals who need help with generalized touching, such as handshakes, high-fives, etc., along with touch-deprived individuals. The treatment is safe, gentle, and effective and can positively impact an individual's physical, emotional, and mental health.

TYPES OF NONSEXUAL/NON-AROUSING/NON-ROMANTIC TOUCHES YOU MAY EXPERIENCE DURING A SESSION:

 

Touch Direct Contact Therapy sessions involve a trained professional practitioner who provides a safe and comfortable environment for clients to receive physical touch and affection. The practitioner may use techniques such as holding, hugging, and gentle stroking to create a sense of warmth and security. The sessions are usually conducted privately and can last 1-3 hours.

Additional types of touch may include but are not limited to:  

  • Arm Around The Waist

  • Arm Linking

  • Back Rubbing

  • Cuddling

  • Fist Bumps

  • Hair Stroking

  • Hand On The Arm

  • Hand On The Back

  • Hand On The Face

  • Hand On The Head

  • Hand On The Knee

  • Hand On The Shoulder

  • Handshakes

  • Head Resting On The Shoulder

  • High-Fives

  • Holding Hands

  • Holding Someone's Face In Your Hands

  • Holding Someone's Hand While Walking

  • Hugging

  • Leg Leaning

  • Massaging Someone's Temples

  • Shoulder Patting

  • Side Hugs

  • Sitting Arm In Arm

  • Sitting Close To Each Other

  • Sitting On Someone's Lap

 

WHAT TOUCH DIRECT CONTACT IS AND IS NOT:

Touch Direct Contact Therapy is not a form of massage or physical therapy. It is a therapeutic technique to help individuals connect with their emotions and feelings. The TDCT Practitioner uses touch to help the client feel safe and supported, which can help them to open up and share their thoughts and feelings.

Touch Direct Contact Therapy is not appropriate for everyone. It is essential to have a thorough assessment before starting this type of therapy to ensure it is safe and proper for the individual. Individuals who have experienced trauma or abuse may find Touch Direct Contact Therapy triggering, which may not be the best. At Positive Peer Mentoring, our screening consultations are FREE and last 30-60 minutes.

 

Touch Direct Contact Therapy is not a replacement for other forms of therapy. It is often used in conjunction with other forms of treatment, such as talk therapy or cognitive-behavioral therapy. It is vital to have a comprehensive treatment plan that addresses all aspects of an individual's mental health.

On the other hand, Touch Direct Contact Therapy is a powerful tool for healing and growth. It can help individuals feel more connected to their bodies and emotions, leading to greater self-awareness and self-acceptance. It can also help individuals to develop a greater understanding of trust and intimacy in their relationships.

For example, someone who has experienced trauma may have difficulty connecting with their emotions and feel disconnected from their body. Touch Direct Contact Therapy can help them feel safe and supported, allowing them to connect with their feelings and begin to process their trauma.

IN-DEPTH EXCLAMATION ON ARGUMENTS AND EXAMPLES:

Argument: Touch Direct Contact Therapy is a powerful tool for emotional healing.

Example: Someone who has experienced trauma may have difficulty connecting with their emotions and feel disconnected from their body. Touch Direct Contact Therapy can help them feel safe and supported, allowing them to connect with their feelings and begin to process their trauma.

Argument: Touch Direct Contact Therapy can help individuals develop greater trust and intimacy in their relationships.

 

Example: A person who has difficulty trusting others may benefit from Touch Direct Contact Therapy. The TDCT Practitioner can provide a safe and supportive environment where the individual can learn to trust and feel comfortable with physical touch, which can translate to their relationships.

Argument: Touch Direct Contact Therapy is not a replacement for other forms of therapy.

Example: While Touch Direct Contact Therapy can be a powerful tool for emotional healing, it is not a replacement for other forms of therapy. It is often used with other forms of therapy, such as talk therapy or cognitive-behavioral therapy, to provide a comprehensive treatment plan that addresses all aspects of an individual's mental health.

Argument: Touch Direct Contact Therapy can help individuals to feel more connected to their bodies and emotions.

 

Example: Individuals who struggle with anxiety or depression may feel disconnected from their bodies and emotions. Touch Direct Contact Therapy can help them feel more present and connected, leading to greater self-awareness and self-acceptance.

 

Argument: Touch Direct Contact Therapy is not a form of massage or physical therapy.

Example: While Touch Direct Contact Therapy involves physical touch, it is not a form of massage or physical therapy. The TDCT Practitioner uses touch to help the client feel safe and supported, which can help them to open up and share their thoughts and feelings.

Argument: Touch Direct Contact Therapy can be a valuable tool for individuals struggling to express their emotions verbally.

 

Example: Some individuals may have difficulty expressing their emotions verbally but feel more comfortable expressing themselves through physical touch. Touch Direct Contact Therapy can provide a safe and supportive environment for these individuals to connect with their emotions and express themselves.

 

Argument: Touch Direct Contact Therapy can be used to address a variety of mental health issues.

 

Example: Touch Direct Contact Therapy can be used to address a variety of mental health issues, including anxiety, depression, trauma, and relationship problems. It is a versatile form of therapy that can be tailored to meet each client's needs.

REMINDERS FROM THIS SECTION:

The section discussed Touch Direct Contact Therapy (TDCT), a form of therapy that involves physical touch between a practitioner and a client. TDCT is a controlled exposure therapy that helps individuals overcome diagnoses caused by emotional and physiological hardships by offering them physical interaction with a trusted professional. The section clarifies that TDCT is nonsexual, non-arousing, and non-romantic, designed to help touch-deprived individuals. The area also lists various types of nonsexual, non-arousing, and non-romantic touches that a client may experience during a TDCT session. The section emphasizes that TDCT is not a replacement for other forms of therapy and is often used in conjunction with other forms of treatment. Finally, the section argues that TDCT is a powerful tool for emotional healing, can help individuals develop greater trust and intimacy in their relationships, and can be used to address various mental health issues.

RECOURSES AND FURTHER READING:

Here are some resources that may help you learn more about Touch Direct Contact Therapy:

1. International Association of Trauma Professionals: https://www.traumapro.net/

2. American Psychological Association: https://www.apa.org/

3. Touch Research Institute: https://www6.miami.edu/touch-research/

4. The Center for Mind-Body Medicine: https://cmbm.org/

5. The Somatic Experiencing Trauma Institute: https://traumahealing.org/

TOUCH THERAPY FOR INDIVIDUALS ENROLLED IN THERAPY WITH A PSYCHOLOGIST OR PSYCHIATRISTS

For those in therapy, you may be wondering “How Does A Touch Session Complement Therapy”:

Trained Touch practitioners can ally with you to add the therapeutic element of touch to your treatment.

 

A session can greatly benefit those who are working with:

- Managing anxiety and depression.

- Communicating boundaries, needs, and wants.

- Developing a sense of empowerment or have experienced having their consent taken away.

 - Recovering from abuse and resulting trauma: sexual, physical, psychological, and emotional Improving low self-esteem and struggling with body image.

 - Overcoming codependency in relationships and related attachment disorders.

TOUCH THERAPY FOR THOSE WITHOUT

MENTAL ILLNESS AND THOSE NOT IN THERAPY

You may be asking yourself why touch-therapy if you are not in therapy.

 

Consensual therapeutic contact soothes the unmet need for healthy connection. It provides a safe way to harness the stress-reducing biochemistry of the human body. 

BENEFITS OF THERAPEUTIC CONTACT

Our society is suffering from chronic social isolation and touch deprivation, and, to make matters worse, we have also sexualized contact. Touch deprivation is linked to anxiety, depression, aggression, stress, violent behavior, impulsiveness, low job performance, poor relational skills, etc.

 

Sadly, many people come from communities where they were never, or rarely, touched by their parents, family members, or friends or only experience touch through sex. There's a better way. Touch Therapy allows high-fives, pats on the back, hugging, and cuddling that provide a mutually beneficial touch that many of us never received in the past or currently do not experience in the present. Much like yoga, meditation, and mindfulness, professional therapeutic touch through cuddling is healing and transformative when it happens respectfully and emotionally safe. 

 

Try a therapeutic TCDT session with our Mentor, Corinne Pulliam, a practitioner of touch therapy, and see how much more alive you will feel. She looks forward to embracing your therapeutic needs.

 

WHAT IS THIS TYPE OF SESSION GOOD FOR?

A session can:

 

● Improve immunity,
● Enhance mood,
● Serve as an energetic elixir for all patients, especially those with chronic medical conditions.
● Build self-esteem
● Increase trust and self-reliance
● Decrease anxiety and depression

Consensual touch can actually help us reclaim our deepest needs and the voice to express them. We can learn with another person that it is safe and provides a positive feeling in our mental and physical selves and to recognize what we want. We can notice and say what we don't want and have it heard and respected, and even welcomed! We can find our voice in the presence of someone who has theirs. When we reclaim it, we can help others reclaim it. The more people who do that, the more positive change happens on an increasingly larger scale. The less shame, and blame, and the more constructive mutually satisfying interactions happen in the world, the better the world gets for everyone.

 

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