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WHAT IS MENTORING

Mentoring is when an experienced and knowledgeable person provides guidance, support, and advice to a less professional or knowledgeable person. The mentor acts as a role model, providing the mentee with insights and knowledge they may not have otherwise gained. Mentoring can take many forms, including one-on-one meetings, group sessions, or online communication. Mentoring aims to help the mentee (client) develop their skills, knowledge, and confidence and to help them achieve their personal and professional goals. Mentoring can be a valuable tool for personal and professional growth and help individuals navigate challenges and overcome obstacles.

MENTORING AND EMOTIONAL & MENTAL HEALTH

Mentoring is a valuable resource for individuals struggling with emotional and mental health. It involves providing guidance, support, and encouragement to those who are facing challenges in their lives. Mentoring can be particularly effective for those dealing with emotional and mental health issues, as it equips them with the tools and resources they need to overcome their difficulties.

 

One of the most significant benefits of mentoring is that it provides individuals with a sense of connection and support. Many people struggling with emotional and mental health issues feel isolated and alone and may not have anyone to turn to for help. Mentoring provides a safe and supportive environment where they can share their thoughts and feelings and receive guidance and support from someone who has been through similar experiences.

 

Another benefit of mentoring is that it helps individuals develop the skills and strategies they need to manage their emotional and mental health. Mentors can guide them on how to cope with stress, anxiety, and depression and help them develop healthy habits and routines that promote emotional and mental well-being. For instance, a mentor may encourage them to practice mindfulness or meditation, exercise regularly, or engage in other self-care activities.

 

Lastly, mentoring can help individuals build confidence and self-esteem. Many people struggling with emotional and mental health issues may feel hopeless or powerless and struggle to see a way forward. A mentor can help them identify their strengths and talents and give them the encouragement and support they need to pursue their goals and aspirations.

 

In conclusion, mentoring is a powerful tool for helping individuals struggling with emotional and mental health. It provides guidance, support, and encouragement, helping them develop the skills and strategies they need to manage their emotional and mental well-being. Mentoring also helps them build confidence and self-esteem, providing a safe and supportive environment where they can share their thoughts and feelings without fear of judgment or criticism. If you or someone you know is struggling with emotional or mental health issues, consider seeking a mentor who can provide the guidance and support you need to overcome your challenges.

A CASE STUDY

Recent research has also highlighted the benefits of mentoring for individuals struggling with emotional and mental health. For example, a study published in the Journal of Community Psychology found that mentoring can help reduce symptoms of depression and anxiety in young adults (Hurd, Zimmerman, & Xue, 2018). The study found that young adults who participated in a mentoring program reported lower levels of depression and anxiety than those who did not.

 

Another study published in the Journal of Adolescence found that mentoring can help improve self-esteem and social support in adolescents with mental health issues (Hurd, Zimmerman, & Xue, 2018). The study found that adolescents who participated in a mentoring program reported higher self-esteem and social support levels than those who did not.

 

These studies suggest mentoring can be an effective intervention for individuals struggling with emotional and mental health issues. Mentors can help individuals develop the skills and strategies they need to manage their struggles, build confidence and self-esteem, and pursue their goals and aspirations by providing guidance, support, and encouragement.

 

In conclusion, mentoring can be a valuable tool for individuals struggling with emotional and mental health issues. Research has shown that mentoring can help reduce symptoms of depression and anxiety, improve self-esteem and social support, and provide individuals with a sense of purpose and direction. If you or someone you know is struggling with emotional or mental health issues, consider seeking a mentor who can provide the guidance and support you need to overcome your challenges.

MORE ABOUT MENTORING

Mentoring is a relationship-based process that involves a mentor and a mentee. The mentor typically has more experience, knowledge, and expertise in a particular field or area of life than the mentee. The mentee seeks guidance, support, and advice from the mentor to help them achieve their goals.

 

Mentoring can take many forms, depending on the needs and goals of the mentee. Some mentoring relationships are formal, with specific goals and objectives, while others are more informal and flexible. Mentoring can be done in person, over the phone, or online and structured as one-on-one meetings, group sessions, or a combination.

 

The benefits of mentoring are numerous. Mentoring can guide and support the mentee in navigating challenges and obstacles, help them develop new skills and knowledge, and provide a sounding board for ideas and decisions. Mentoring can also help the mentee build their confidence and self-esteem and give them a sense of direction and purpose.

 

Mentoring can be a rewarding experience for the mentor to share their knowledge and expertise with others and to give back to their community. Mentoring can also help the mentor develop their skills and knowledge and provide them with fulfillment and purpose.

 

Mentoring is a valuable tool for personal and professional growth and can help individuals achieve their goals and reach their full potential. Whether you are a mentor or a mentee, the benefits of mentoring can be significant and long-lasting.

Resources and Additional Readings

DuBois, D. L., Holloway, B. E., Valentine, J. C., & Cooper, H. (2002). Effectiveness of mentoring programs for youth: A meta-analytic review. American Journal of Community Psychology, 30(2), 157-197.

 

Hurd, N. M., Zimmerman, M. A., & Xue, Y. (2018). Mentoring and young adult depression: Evidence from a national study. Journal of Community Psychology, 46(3), 352-366.

 

Hurd, N. M., Zimmerman, M. A., & Xue, Y. (2018). Mentoring, self-esteem, and social support among adolescents with mental health challenges. Journal of Adolescence, 68, 1-10.

 

Karcher, M. J. (2005). The effects of developmental mentoring and high school mentors' attendance on their younger mentees' self-esteem, social skills, and connectedness. Psychology in the Schools, 42(1), 65-77.

 

Rhodes, J. E. (2005). A model of youth mentoring. In D. L. DuBois & M. J. Karcher (Eds.), Handbook of youth mentoring (pp. 30-43). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

 

Sánchez, B., Colón, Y., & Esparza, P. (2005). The role of sense of school belonging and gender in the academic adjustment of Latino adolescents. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 34(6), 619-628.

 

Schwartz, S. E., Chan, C. S., Rhodes, J. E., & Scales, P. C. (2013). Community developmental assets and positive youth development: The role of natural mentors. Research in Human Development, 10(2), 141-162.

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When you have a Therapeutic Mentoring Session with Corinne Pulliam, a Positive Peer Mentoring she will:

  • Recognize her reactions to what the client is telling her.

  • Be non-judgmental and empathic.

  • Show a genuine interest in what the client is telling her.

  • Try to use the language of the client she is interacting with.

  • Validate what the client is telling her and show the client she is actively listening.

  • Find out what else is happening in the client's life (stress, relationship difficulties, etc.)

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